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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate. iran had been helpful, rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least been not actively and helpful but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be coopted and that would have collaborated new arrangements and instead we send them to guantanamo and send very negative signals to those who might consider coopting and being coopted into the new system and it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems and despite the fact that now more than ten years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign. we have come a long way than many of us realize and i think some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia society put out a couple weeks ago which showed in disti
responsibility in the aftermath of the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we had successfully built for the war and for the peace conference to disintegrate. iran had been very helpful. week rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least then not actively and helpful. but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were a certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be cooperative, that would have collaborated. instead, we sent them to guantanamo, and sent a negative signal to those who might consider who being coopted into the new system. it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems, and despite the fact that now, more than 10 years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign in afghanistan, i think we have come a longer way than many of us realize. some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia s
in 2009. taliban will be given a seat at table and allowed to open an office in qatar. the taliban must first renounce terrorism. >> bret: we talked about what the troop number will be at the end of 2014. what is the going thinking on that. what about the concern about protecting those troops if the number is very low? >> well, absolutely. what we have confirmed is general john allen, the top commanderrer in afghanistan given the national security team around the president three options. 9,000 option, 6,000 option. and 3,000 option. the president will likely decide on 3,000 to 6,000 troops and that will not give you much option in terms of the training and assisting the afghanistan security forces. they will set up bases to deal with al-qaeda if fringe area along the border. >> bret: we'll follow it. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. thank you. do you think the president should speed up the process of having afghan take control of the security? let me know on twitter. to me at bret baier. the politics, west virginia senator rockefeller will not seek a sixth term. the leader of the congr
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
will not bode well for the peace talks with the taliban. it comes at a time when the u.s. and pakistan are making efforts to engage with them. pakistan said the program was counterproductive and of violation of its sovereignty. -- a violation of its sovereignty. >> they have eliminated a crucial link, whether it has any major impact on the reconciliation process, it is difficult to say at the moment. there is someone else who could walk into the footsteps. >> u.s. troops are said to leave in 2014. this death could further jeopardize the prospects of these future -- of a future deal. the killing also coincides with a conditional offer by the pakistanis about a possible cease-fire. military leaders are due to meet on friday. the killing is expected to have an impact on pakistan's 2014 strategy. al jazeera, is all about. >> as western troops prepare to pullout, a growing number of citizens are considering leaving. they fear the possible return of the taliban and more instability. when the taliban were toppled in 2001, 52,000 applied for asylum overseas. that number dropped away from 25,00
as taliban momentum, and to give ourselves a bridge force to give us time to build up afghan security forces did i reluctantly come to the conclusion we're going to need more western forces, probably mostly american. we came up with detailed analysis on what we had to secure to be effective, and the requirement was for 40,000 forces. and so we recommended that which followed not long after our strategic assessment. >> rose: after the number of troops had already come in because of mckernen. >> yes. some of those forces hadn't yet arrived. >> rose: then you went to london. >> yes. >> rose: and you make a speech. the speech is okay. then there's a q&a session. >> yes. >> rose: and you say what. >> rose: i went to london at the request of the british government to engage parts of both their media and their government to explain the strategy. at that time we were executing a strategy that i had derived a mission strategy i derived from president obama's public statements his speeches in the spring when he authorized more forces and my understanding of what it is my mission was which had beg
assassinated for challenging the taliban has gotten out of the hospital. we'll tell you about her story up next. >>> she challenged the taliban and nearly died for. it well, tonight the teenage pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt is out of a pressure hospital. >> rita nissan -- out of auburn hospital. >> rita nissan has the story. >> reporter: 15-year-old malala walked slowly but steadily holding a nurse's hand as she left the hospital. she hugged and thanked the medical staff and waved good- bye almost three months after a taliban gunman shot her in the head at point blank range. the shooting happened in northwest pakistan. the taliban attacked malala leaving school. the terror group targeted the teenager because she openly challenged the taliban's efforts to deny education and other rights to women. malala was flown to queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham which has treated hundreds of soldiers injured in the wars in afghanistan and iraq. malala will continue to come to this hospital for outpatient therapy. in a few weeks from now she'll be readmitted here for reconstructiv
will the taliban plal in the future of that country. and what role will the united states play after we end our combat mission? how many troops will we keep behind in afghanistan to keep that country secure if we can? jim moran is a democrat congressman from virginia and westmore is a retired army captain and author of "the other wes moore. i guess the question comes down to numbers. 66,000 troops in country right now. what should be it be five years from now. >> i think we're going to initially withdraw to 6,000 troops in 2014. i think a lot of work will be done by contractors, not u.s. troops, but we can't afford to continue spending the kind of money we're spending. you know, we have spent $557 billion up to today, half a trillion dollars, and what have we gotten for it? burma, somalia, and afghanistan are the three most corrupt nations in the world, and now almost 90% of that corruption is coming from american taxpayers' money. you'd be shocked at the amount of american taxpayers' money that's being spent over in dubai because it came in to afghanistan. this is a nation that's -- a governme
be an option that would probably lead to an afghan government under pressure from taliban, perhaps, al qaeda. you know the world in a vacuum i think that would start to leave a vacuum by the government to be filled by taliban for sure and result in afghanistan that is found before the turn of the century. >> you would recommend against it? >> if i were still in office yes, i would. i think there's potential in afghanistan to make the place a lot more secure with the afghan forces but it will take more time than we have currently. >> why do you think the white house may see it differently? >> i think part of it is there's always a tension between getting afghans to take responsibility for their own actions, and making sure they're doing all they can and not overly relying on u.s. and allied forces. i think part of what we're seeing is playing out probably in the media here is to put some pressure on the karzai government to be realistic about their expectations and make sure afghans are doing all they can to ensure their own security. >> what might come out of the karzai
afghanistan to launch attacks against our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure and insurgents continue to lose territory. afghan forces continue to grow stronger, meanwhile. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges, but because this progress our transition is on track. last year we agreed with partners that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid 2013. president karzai and his team have been here for several days, we have consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight
troops would weaken the negotiating position about those negotiations with the taliban ever got started again. now, the taliban, that's been one of their demands. all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014. and there are some who feel the white house 234r0floated this io sort of, you know, lay the ground work to get some perhaps concessions on some other issues that are important to the white house. in other words, more of a negotiati negotiati negotiating ploy. >> it's been a tense relationship on many occasions. be interesting to know how this meeting goes in that regard. also he's the guy they have to deal with. he's the only player they really can deal with. but the reality is he still doesn't run much of afghanistan in the real world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the gene
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and that you cannot resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that a about 3 -- we believe that about every country in the world. we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution as protection for minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghanistan's long term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will poli
with a helicopter pilots while this is going on and watch the gunbattle that went on between the taliban and enforcement on the ground. i got the story and essentially i was -- i agreed with the public affairs people in kandahar that it was time for me to get out of kandahar and go back to kabul and eventually the united states. so it was a very intense experience for me and very strange. week got rocketed in kandahar and i'm trying to write a blogpost about general detritus and rockets, knocked the power out. i got on the first military flight and usually it's really hard to get on a military flight. this was pretty easy. they put me on a flight ready quickly and all the soldiers had copies printed out of the story. i had never seen anything like it. c-span: how did they treat you? >> guest: they treated me well. almost everyone, there were a few exceptions but most people in the military have always treated me with respect. c-span: what would you tell somebody that wanted to do the same thing you have done? i mean, what should they expect? talk some more about the reporters in the esta
. the pakistanis schoolgirl who was shot in the head by the taliban has been discharged from the hospital. she will have to return to the hospital for more surgery to repair the damage to her school. she is a prominent campaigner for girls education in pakistan. >> , they all look to her as one of the persons who have bravely stood, despite her age. it is against this barbarism. they look to her, and she is determined to continue her mission, which is to say she is following in the footsteps of [indiscernible] >> doctors say a him transplant patient is making progress. >> mark had suffered a paralyzed hand as a result of years of gout, and was told after christmas that a suitable match was available. >> the feeling as to started to come back. everything is looking very good. it is doing well. >> hand transplants were pioneered in france in the late 1990's. the doctors say they kept in close touch with french experts during the procedures. >> he had a functionalists hand before, no function at all. over the next six months to a year, we expect to see recovery of movement, recovery of power. >>
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
as separate compounds belonging to the pakistani taliban in south missouri stan. the taliban commander was reportedly among the dead. the ongoing drone attacks come days after a federal judge ruled the obama administration is under no obligation to publicly disclose their legal justification. the american civil liberties union and the new york times had filed a lawsuit under the freedom of information act demanding u.s. government disclose the legal basis for launching drone strikes overseas. the suit was filed after the u.s. kill the american-born cleric anwar al awlaki in yemen despite having never charged him with a crime. in upholding the obama at the ministration's right to secrecy, u.s. district judge colleen mcmahon expressed misgivings about the drone program itself writing -- the alice-in-wonderland nature some of the first details have emerged on the white house's effort to tackle gun control in the aftermath of last month's shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut. the washington buzz reports the task force overseen by vice- president joe biden is mulling proposals include
attacked by taliban gun men malala is being discharged. she was shot in the head for speaking out advocating education for pakistani girls. the 15-year-old now an international symbol of courage. an amazing story of recovery there. >>> his term in the house is over but barney frank could be back on capitol hill. the lawmaker told msnbc he asked to be appointed as a temporary senator if john kerry becomes secretary of state. frank says he wants to be a part of the looming battle over the debt ceiling but says he has no interest in running for the position permanently. >>> let's see if you can spot the difference between the two photos. one of the photos released by nancy pelosi's office and the other shows who is standing on the capitol hill. it is obvious that four congress women have been photo shopped into the picture. pelosi asked if she considered it an accurate historical record today. >> it is active of who the democratic women of congress are and it was freezing cold and our members had been waiting a long time for everyone to arrive and had to get back into the building to
? >>> worldwide for the amazing triumph over the taliban. after they, of course, shot malala in the head. she has been discharged from the hospital. cnn national correspond respondent matthew chance is following developments from london. what is the hospital saying this morning? >> pretty good news malala yousefzai laying in the hospital since shot by the taliban, making a pretty good recovery. this is a picture of her walking out of her hotel room. speaking with nurses who have been giving medical care over the past several months. a statement saying malala is a strong young woman and worked hard with people caring for her to make excellent progress in her recovery. she will be staying at her parents' temporary home in birmingham in england, where the hospital is located. they have been flown out from pakistan. the father has been given a job in birmingham for the next three years as the consulate. they expect to stay there for the foreseeable future. she will be going back into the ward wards at the end of this month, beginning of next month to have reconstruction on her skull. a recovery, but
, including a taliban commander with ties to the pakistani military. demonstrators protested against drone strikes thursday and burned a u.s. flag. >>> well, the man accused in one of the country's worst mass murders goes to court tomorrow. a judge will decide whether there's enough evidence for 25-year-old james holmes to stand trial. he faces more than 150 counts, including first-degree murder and attempted murder in the aurora, colorado, movie theater shooting last july. 12 people were killed, dozens injured. some of the victims are expected to testify in the week-long hearing. >>> well, fire up the zambonis. hockey could be back in a matter of days. the national hockey league and the players association struck a tentative labor agreement today according to a statement posted on the league website. that would end the more than 100-day lockout. if players and owners approve the agreement, the nhl could pay a -- play a 48-game schedule slated to begin as early as next week. >>> let's turn to washington now and word from a top administration official that president obama plans to nominate
immaturity of afghan forces alongside the continuing presence of the taliban, isn't it in our interest to walk slowly out of this conflict rather than too quickly? >> well, it may be in our national security interest to do that, martin, but there's been a great deal of anticipation that this conflict was coming to an end. we saw during the presidential campaign that they d republicans tried to make a big deal of squabbling over the details but they, too, were seeing a fairly rapid end to this, and this expedites it somewhat more quickly. so i think there's going to be a lot of crossing of fingers and hoping things don't turn into an even worse disaster there. but this had already been baked in the cake. there's no political will to stay any further. >> okay. mike, i followed much of what you have written on the subject of afghanistan, and it seems as though you feel a little more optimistic about the country. but given the endemic corruption, the harboring of pakistani terrorists along the border, the confused way that nato has pumped money into afghanistan, do we leave a nation that r
. and the taliban issued a statement saying if u.s. troops are left here they vow and promise more war and destruction. >> thanks to you. be safe, as well. the numbers being floated in terms of how many troops the u.s. might leave in afghanistan have ranged as high as 20,000. they are as low as 3,000. let's get to the war room. former chief of staff for west virginia. a republican strategist and former aid to president george h.w. bush. what do you think that we will hear from this meeting between president obama and president karzai. >> president obama i'm sure will listen to the laundry list of complaints that president karzai has. i think both are concerned about the local audience, that is to say the domestic audience. president karzai is concerned about the audience at home and president obama has to consider the bigger picture. >> chris, with the political reality is that the public wants out of afghanistan. and the political reality in afghanistan is that they want u.s. troops to leave, why, then, keep any troops in afghanistan? >> that is a really good question. i think you are
in response to gun violence. >>> the pakistani education crusader shot in the head by the taliban is now out of a british hospital. she was released yesterday. the teen will continue undergoing rehabilitation in the u.k. >>> google's ceo is visiting an unlikely place, north korea, a place that keeps a welded lid on technology information. bill richardson has been there several times. it's being called a private humanitarian visit, and it's not on behalf of the obama administration. sources say governor richardson could try to negotiate the release of an american prisoner who was captured there last month. >>> all right, the fiscal cliff, hill, slope, time bomb, whatever you want to call it, aren't you glad to be over the metaphor madness about what this thing is? >> kick the can down the road. >> it's just kicking the can down the road. >> kicking the can. >> we are done with kicking this can down the road. >> oh, yeah. the fiscal cliff turned into a can. too bad those metaphors aren't gone with the fiscal cliff. that's next. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa aut
that would be under pressure from taliban, perhaps al qaeda. you know, the world, of course, is a vacuum. i think that would start to leave a vacuum and a vulnerability to the afghan government that would be filled by taliban for sure and could result in an afghanistan that we found before the turn of this century. >> so you would recommend against it. >> if i were still in office, yes, i would. i think there's potential there in afghanistan to make the place a lot more secure with afghan forces, but it's going to take more time than we have currently. >> why do you think the white house may see it differently? >> i think part of it is there's always tension between getting afghans to take responsibility for their own actions and making sure they're doing all they can and not overly relying on u.s. and allied forces. so i think part of what we're seeing is playing out probably in the media here is to put some pressure on the karzai government to be realistic about their expectations and make sure that the afghans are doing all they can to ensure their own security. >> what might come out of
as a whole, and how they will sustain the fight against the taliban after most american troops are gone. when i say "most american troops," i'm leaving open the doors the president has for leaving behind a training advisory and counter terrorism mission of some thousands of troops. the president wants to do this as he did in iraq, the hang up as also in iraq is whether the afghani government grants a status of forces agreement that will give us legal immunity for our troops. that's the american military presence around the world. we have it now in afghanistan based upon u.n. and other considerations, but that expires in 2014. that's the key issue that they are looking at right now. what president karzaiments beyond some troops is military support in terms of funding equipment and also economic assistance. cheryl: not a lot of willingness on either side to come to an agreement, we hope there's a sense today on what u.s. troops are doing in afghanistan after 20 # 14, but there are some of the democratic party that say we need to pull all troops out of afghanistan by 2014 with the resurgence of
, one of which killed a taliban commander. >>> 130 trained mountain rescuers are combing a five-mile area east of seattle. they are looking for this man, 29-year-old curt rupert of lake city, florida. he disappeared three days ago during a skydiving trip. friends say they last saw rupert jump when he -- rather when he jumped out of a helicopter above the cascade mountains. authorities still hoping to find him alive. they say his parachute may have snagged a tree on the way down. >>> and cnn has learned that tomorrow, president obama will announce chuck hagel as his nominee to be defense secretary. the former senator from nebraska is a vietnam war hero and served on capitol hill for more than a decade but his confirmation process isn't expected to be smooth. athena jones is at the white house and hagel, athena, has angered some lawmakers, many because of the positions he has taken up on middle east issues. what has he done that could cause challenges, say, for him here? >> reporter: well, that's right. even though this is a republican who served as nebraska senator for two terms,
, continuing to provide advisorses. in other words, give them the tools to fight the taliban. i think that in fact they're going to be motivated, partly because the taliban are going to behave so badly like they did before that we will find afghans win to fight them. it might not necessarily be president karzai, but there will be afghan actors who will fight the taliban. >>brian: you say one of the things the soviets did wrong, the soviet union collapsed, gorbachev takes over, and the reason why what the afghans left collapsed is because the soviets cut them off. >> gorbachev continued to arm them. it was yeltsin. as soon as yeltsin took over at our behest, he took overt marxist regime and within months it fell. >>brian: you look at egypt and iraq, you've been to iraq when saddam was in power in afghanistan, and you say wait, when we pull out, they'll realize we are best friend they could possibly have. >> i think what they're going to find is their problems aren't over. in other words, they've got an awful lot of enemies in that part of the world. everyone hates each other more than
at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the cia has started off 2013 by using drones to bomb taliban targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> the
. this is some of the problems we have seen. it did not want to narrowly cover just the al qaeda and taliban but could be expanded for whoever the president decides is the enemy. it's troubling. we would be put in a position that we can argue we've reached the end. the last 11 years have shown there's a lot of institutional push for this war to be over with. >> the gentleman over here. >> i'm from the german embassy. my name is joseph. i have a question that may be hypothetical. what would happen if president obama would decide tomorrow to close down guantanamo. he as commander-in-chief, if he would do this, what would happen? could congress or anyone block it? if you make this decision tomorrow, what would happen? >> well, there are practical problems now with where the people can go. so it takes work to get it so you can empty the people out of guantanamo. you really need to open it up so people can come to the united states, certain ones of them, and make it easier for them to go to a third country. -it is a. light- and i go back to lincoln. lincoln could not just say i'm not going to all
months after the taliban tried to kill her for advocating education for girls. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year
that are the taliban and al qaeda. we have an unreliable ally in president karzai, he is erratic and this will cause him to be even more erratic and our own ally will be looking at us and saying, no, where is the united states going. no, judy, i think this was a highly injudicious statement. >> celeste ward gventer, an injudicious statement and bad idea? >> well i have the greatest respect for bing west and i'm honored to be on the show with him but i respectfully disagree. for us to be talking about troop levels right now putting the cart before the horse in any case. because frankly we should be talking about our vision for the region strategically. in any event we still need consider that having no troops there is a real option, and i think to ignore that option would be strategically foolish. we heard about the supposed apandora's box lips that was coming if u.s. troops left iraq. u.s. troops left iraq and the apocalypse has not arrive. that is an option for us and it would be irresponsible for us not to consider it. >> bing west, what is the argument for keeping a significant contingent of troo
there can the afghan forces deal with call died? will taliban take over the country? will al qaeda come back in as a welcome guest? will they move over from pakistan? will they use afghanistan to destablize pakistan which has nuclear arsenal of over 100 weapons? what price security? how much did 9/11 cost us? we have to remember that. we have to be careful we don't just think about dollars and we think about security. melissa: we still have to think about dollars. that is what we started the show talking about how we're spending so much more than we're taking in. everybody has to give something up. we have got to cut money somewhere. when you look at dollars, we have 10,000 troops in there after 2014 it could cost $15 billion a year. 20,000 troops, that is $25 billion a year. the numbers become significant. a lot of americans wonder what are we getting for that? is it worth it when we're really going broke here in this country? >> well the way i see it, i don't quibble with you about getting our economic house in order coming from a conservative think tank of. i think we're in agreement ther
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)

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